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Recovery After Training Camp

Recovery After Training Camp

After a large block of training such as an intensive training camp, your body will need to recover in order to ‘absorb’ or ‘adapt’ to the workload.

Immune System

Your immune system will be compromised with the high workload. Your body will be spending significant energy repairing damaged tissues, sometimes with the expense of supporting your immune system. Focus on getting in nutrient-dense food & good hygiene practices.

Mental Break

After a weekend, week or longer focused on triathlon, you’ll need a bit of a mental refresh. Sometimes you feel mentally drained from concentrating during sessions and recovery or learning new skills. It is easy to lose motivation when back in your home environment. A recovery week will also allow you more time to spend with family members & friends you may have neglected when on camp.

Muscle & Central Nervous System Fatigue

Each time you place stress or load on a tissue (muscle or nerve) it becomes damaged at a microscopic level. When your body rebuilds these tissues, they become stronger. For the rebuild process to occur you need to rest & not continue loading the tissues to the same level.

 

Triathletes, and high-level endurance athletes, are typically highly motivated and keen to resume normal training ASAP. Learn to read the signs of fatigue displayed by your body and trust your coach & the process to get the recovery right. This will avoid overtraining syndrome resulting in illness or injury in the 4-6 weeks post camp.

Further Reading

GPC Squad – Periodisation for Individual Sports

GPC Squad – What Being Coached Means

GPC Squad – Sleep for Athletes

Training Peaks – How to Recover Like a Pro Cyclist

By |2018-07-08T20:48:14+00:00July 8th, 2018|Categories: Coaches Corner, Multisport, Recovery|Tags: , , , |Comments Off on Recovery After Training Camp

About the Author:

3x AG World Champion. Kate has been doing triathlons for almost five years. She started in a beginner squad with a mountain bike and no previous cycling of running training. Kate began initially to meet new people, stay fit & for a new challenge. Her competitive spirit quickly took over and she started training more & more to improve & keep up with the squad.